10 Plant-based Proteins You Should Be Eating

Veden - Best Plant-Based Proteins

Today I’m talking all about my favorite, top 10, plant-based proteins that anyone and everyone can start incorporating into their diets! “So where do you get your protein” is probably one of the most common questions those practicing a plant-centric lifestyle get, and now you can supply them will all this knowledge and say “here!” + a free download at the bottom so you can print this guide off and hang it up on your pantry or in your kitchen as a gentle reminder to try some new foods.

TOP 10 PLANT BASED PROTEINSTO INCORPORATE DAILY

lentils Nutrition Stripped, lentils health benefits, nutrition facts of lentils

1. LENTILS

Lentils are an amazing hearty and clean source of protein, carbohydrates,, fiber, iron, and vitamin B. They are considered to be the perfect meat substitute or addition to a summer salad.

Usage: 

  • Soups
  • Dals and Stews
  • Salads
  • Lentil Dips & Spreads
  • Lentils as a Meat Replacement

Hemp Seeds Nutrition Stripped, health benefits of, nutrition facts

2. HEMP SEEDS

Hemp seeds are one of the best plant-based proteins, as they also contain heart healthy fats mainly omega-3 fatty acids. They’re seamless to digest and contain roughly 13 grams of protein in just 3 tablespoons. They have a delicious subtly sweet and nutty flavor and are so small in size, they can easily be used and added to any recipe to boost the protein content.

Health Benefits:

  • Stress Relief
  • Healthy Fats – Omega 3s
  • Add to smoothies
  • Make hemp seed milk
  • Make Hemp Seed Crumble
  • Add to hummus, dips, or dressings by blending the hemp seeds into it
  • Sprinkle on top of porridge, oatmeals, or other cereals
  • Add into baked goods and desserts for added protein
  • More information on the nutrition and health benefits of hemp seeds, click here.
  • RECIPES using hemp seeds, click here.

3. CHIA SEEDS

Chia seeds are an ancient seed used for centuries for their amazing properties to absorb water and turn into a gel-like substance because of the soluble fiber content contained in the seeds. Due to this unique characteristic, chia seeds are great to add to meals and foods to thicken naturally, while also boosting the fiber, protein, and healthy fats. mainly omega-3’s

Nutrition: 2 tablespoons = 4g protein
Uses:

  • Sprinkle on top of porridges, oatmeal, and cold cereals for a crunch
  • Soak for at least 30 minutes in almond milk for a basic chia seed pudding.
  • Soak in water for a Chia Fresca/Bubble Water for a refreshing and hydrating beverage
  • More information on the nutrition and health benefits of chia seeds, click here.
  • RECIPES using chia seeds, click here.

Quinoa Nutrition Stripped, health benefits of, nutrition facts

4. QUINOA

Quinoa is a gluten free grain, technically a seed, but used as a carbohydrate. It’s considered a starchy protein because it contains carbohydrates as well as protein and fiber.

Nutrition: 1/2 cup cooked quinoa = 7-9g protein
Uses:

  • Cook and top on raw or cooked greens
  • Use in a Nourish Bowl or One Bowl Skillet Meal
  • Use as a a hot or cold cereal by adding homemade nut milk and fresh fruit
  • Use a bed of quinoa instead of a bed of rice for stir-fry dishes or a side dish
  • Quinoa can also be used as a pilaf, such as the Citrus Quinoa Pilaf on NS
  • More information on the nutrition and health benefits of chia seeds, click here.
  • RECIPES using quinoa, click here.

5. SPIRULINA

Spirulina is incredibly protein rich, it’s one of the few sources of plant-based proteins that are mostly protein by dry weight, about 70%. It’s deep blue-green in color and changes everything you mix with it that color green. It tastes subtly sweet and nutty (hints of vanilla and chocolate), but with a background seaweed flavor.

Nutrition: 2 tablespoons spirulina = 8g protein
Uses:

6. NUTRITIONAL YEAST

Nutritional yeast is a staple food item in plant-based diets due to it’s cheesy flavor, versatility, high amounts of B vitamins, and protein. Nutritional yeast contains no dairy or active yeast, it’s found in a powder/flake form and creates a paste when mixed with liquid- i.e. it’s great for making sauces, dressings, and more with.

Nutrition: 3 tablespoons nutritional yeast = about 12g protein
Uses:

  • Add flaked nutritional yeast to almond milk, or water to create a cheesy dressing or sauce
  • Sprinkle on top of salads, quinoa, lentils, beans, and more for a cheesy flavor
  • Incorporate into dips such as hummus, Baba Ghanoush, or Classic Cashew Cheese
  • More information on the nutrition and health benefits of nutritional yeast, click here.
  • RECIPES using nutritional yeast, click here.

Almonds Nutrition Stripped, health benefits of, nutrition facts

7. SEEDS

Seeds such as sunflower, sesame, chia, hemp, flax, and pumpkin seeds are all not only mineral rich but also protein rich. Seeds vary from type, some are more nutty in flavor whereas others are more sweet and neutral tasting. Pumpkin seeds have an earthy flavor, sesame seeds are very nutty tasting, sunflower seeds are slightly sweet and nutty, and flax and chia seeds taste mildly nutty.

Nutrition: 1/4 cup seeds = around 7-9g protein
Uses:

  • Sprinkle seeds on top of salads or any meal to increase the healthy fat and protein
  • Use in granola, Nourishing Muesli, or other baked goods
  • Grind and use as a “flour” in gluten free baking
  • Grind or pulse coarsely and use in desserts such as the Raw Peach Tart
  • Use in desserts, snacks, truffles, and raw bars for a nutrient dense boost
  • Make your own seed butters by blending
  • Sprinkle on top of oatmeal, porridges, or cold cereals for crunch and protein
  • More information on the nutrition and health benefits of seeds, click here.
  • RECIPES using seeds, click here.

8. NUTS

Nuts such as almonds, walnuts, cashews, pistachios, brazil nuts, and more are not only rich in minerals, Vitamin E, and healthy fats, but also protein rich. Nuts vary from type, some are more nutty in flavor whereas others are more sweet and neutral tasting. Cashews are one of my favorite nuts as they’re incredibly versatile to use in sweet and savory dishes; brazil nuts are my close second favorite because they’re rich in selenium- just eating 1 a day makes up 100% of your DV for selenium.

Nutrition: 1/4 cup nuts = around 7-9g protein
Uses:

  • Sprinkle nuts on top of salads or any meal to increase the healthy fat and protein
  • Use in granola, Nourishing Muesli, or other baked goods
  • Grind and use as a “flour” in gluten free baking
  • Grind or pulse coarsely and use in desserts such as the Raw Peach Tart
  • Use in desserts, snacks, truffles, and raw bars for a nutrient dense boost
  • Make your own nut butters by blending
  • Sprinkle on top of oatmeal, porridges, or cold cereals for crunch and protein
  • More information on the nutrition and health benefits of nuts, click here.
  • RECIPES using nuts, click here.

Beans Nutrition Stripped

9. BEANS

Beans are an amazing source of protein, carbohydrates, and fiber; according to the Nutrition Stripped food pyramid, beans are considered to be a starchy protein similarly to be used like lentils.

Nutrition: 1 cup cooked beans = around 15g protein
Uses:

  • Cooked with your favorite spices and seasonings and eaten plain
  • Top on salads, Nourish Bowls, or One Bowl Skillet Meals
  • Combine with rice or quinoa for a hearty meal
  • Use to make vegetarian meatballs, loafs, or burgers
  • Use as a taco filling or meat sauce for spaghetti
  • More information on the nutrition and health benefits of beans, click here.
  • RECIPES using beans, click here.

10. TEMPEH/ORGANIC TOFU/EDAMAME

Soy containing foods such as tempeh, tofu, and edamame all offer a complete protein, containing all amino acids. Often these sources also carry fiber and healthy fats as well as the protein. Tempeh is the most nutritious out of this bunch,  and an exception to soy foods as it contains natural occurring healthy bacteria from the fermentation process.

Nutrition: 1 serving of tempeh/tofu/edamame = around 20g protein
Uses:

  • Use as you would beans or lentils. Tofu and tempeh both can be marinated.
  • Use tempeh and tofu as toppings to salads.
  • Add to stir-fry meals.
  • Add to sauces such as creating a “meat” spaghetti sauce.
  • Use as filling for tacos, burgers, or even shaped into “hot dogs”.
  • Shopping tip: always purchase organic and sprouted tofu if available, non-GMO if available.
  • RECIPES using tempeh, click here.

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Top Ten Plant based Proteins.

P.S.

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